All posts by themancalledscott

Born of cold and winter air and mountain rain combining, the man called Scott is an ancient sorcerer from a long-forgotten realm. He’s more machine now than man, twisted and evil. Or, you know, he could just be some guy who loves video games, animations and cinema who just wanted to write about such things.

Contra III: The Alien Wars Review


Wizard Dojo

*Review based on Contra III: The Alien Wars’ release as part of the SNES Classic Edition*

Contra was one of the pioneers of the run-and-gun genre, made famous by its hectic action, steep challenge, and for popularizing the Konami Code. On the NES, Contra became one of the premiere third-party franchises for the console. It made perfect sense then, that Contra would make the jump to the Super NES, like so many other NES franchises did. But while the likes of Mario, Zelda and Mega Man found new life on Nintendo’s 16-bit machine, Contra’s leap to the SNES felt more like a continuation of the NES games, as opposed to their evolution. There’s still fun to be had with Contra III, though playing it today, it seems less impressive than many of its SNES peers.

The setup remains the same, with one or two players taking control of musclebound heroes…

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Pokemon 3: The Movie – Spell of the Unown Review


Pokemans three.

Wizard Dojo

This may sound a bit hyperbolic, but Pokemon 3: The Movie felt like the end of an era. Now, Pokemon’s popularity hasn’t exactly waned at all in the years since the film’s 2001 release (it’s still the biggest merchandise seller of any franchise in any medium, and the games remain best-sellers to this day), but this seemed to mark the end of the world’s initial Pokemania, when Pokemon was an inescapable phenomenon. This was the last Pokemon movie to have a wide theatrical release in the United States (subsequent Pokemon features were relegated to select theaters, before receiving the straight-to-video treatment), and it also seemed to be the point when “pet monster” anime was dying down a bit (even Digimon – the closest thing Pokemon had to a rival – fell off the radar with its third season). Pokemon’s fading omnipresence could be seen in Pokemon 3: The Movie…

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Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting Review


Say Hadouken one more time! SAY HADOUKEN ONE MORE TIME!

Wizard Dojo

*Review based on Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting’s release as part of the SNES Classic*

There is no questioning that Street Fighter II is one of the most impactful and important video games ever made. It single-handedly created the fighting game genre, and it could be argued that multiplayer and competitive gaming was forever influenced by it. Street Fighter II was such a success that Capcom continued to re-release the game under various new guises (a trend that continues even today with Ultra Street Fighter II on the Switch). Some of these subsequent releases featured notable changes such as additional characters, others had more subtle gameplay and balancing tweaks. The first such re-release was Street Fighter II: Championship Edition, which turned the four boss characters playable and allowed two players to pick the same characters. After that came Turbo: Hyper Fighting which, although containing the same detailed mechanics as…

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Super Punch-Out!! Review


Yo Adrian!

Wizard Dojo

The Punch-Out!! series is one that many Nintendo fans remember fondly from the big N’s golden age, and with good reason. Though it seemed simplistic, Punch-Out!! boasts the same level of intricacy and depth that Nintendo games are known for. But it also seems relegated to the lesser echelon of Nintendo titles, laying dormant once Nintendo made the jump to 3D up until the series made a triumphant return on the Wii in 2009; only to once again fall off the radar in the years since (but at least series’ hero Little Mac has made it into Smash Bros. now, though he probably should have made the cut a few entries earlier than he did). The series’ final entry in its heyday was Super Punch-Out!! on the SNES, which remains a stellar experience to this day…even if it can get frustratingly difficult at times.

In Super Punch-Out!!, players take control…

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Pokemon: The Movie 2000 Review


Better than the first movie. And also Lugia is cooler than Mewtwo.

Wizard Dojo

In the year 2000, Pokemon was at the height of its popularity. With the second installments – the now-beloved Gold and Silver versions – on the way later in the year, and after the box office success of Pokemon: The First Movie in 1999, Pokemon: The Movie 2000 was sure to be a hit, especially with its emphasis on some of the new Gold and Silver Pokemon. Pokemon: The Movie 2000 didn’t quite reach the ticket sales of its predecessor –  though it is the only anime film that comes close to it in the US box office – it is actually a better movie, with improved character development and a bit of a stronger story.

Pokemon the Movie 2000 sees Pokemon trainer Ash Ketchum, his friends Misty and Tracey, and, of course, the adorable Pokemon Pikachu on an adventure that takes them to Shamouti Island, after a massive storm…

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Pokemon: The First Movie – Mewtwo Strike’s Back Review


I’m gonna take you back to the past.

Wizard Dojo

Go back to 1999. Pokemon dominated the Earth. The monster collecting video game franchise got its start in Japan in 1996, but by the time it made its way to the western world in 1998, the games had a wildly successful anime and a trading card game to go with them. And they all hit stateside at the same time, creating a pop culture phenomenon that I don’t think has been equaled in my lifetime.

It’s not hard to see what made Pokemon popular: It’s ever-increasing roster of Pokemon give it a seemingly endless supply of cute and cool characters, its emphasis on collecting, trading and sharing makes it engaging, and its kid-friendly exterior hides a deceptively deep set of rules and mechanics, whether its in its original video game form or the other media that have spawned from it.

Despite being a marketing goldmine (its merchandise sales exceed that…

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Sonic Forces Review


Uh oh, a 3D Sonic game…

Wizard Dojo

Oh, Sonic.

To say that Sonic the Hedgehog has had a rough history ever since he made the transition into 3D is more than a little bit of an understatement. From games that were decent in their day but aged horribly (Sonic Adventure) to flat-out stinkers (Sonic Boom: The Rise of Lyric), Sonic has become something of a joke.

It finally seemed like Sonic the Hedgehog would make his triumphant return to greatness in 2017. Not only did the series receive a new, 16-bit sidescroller in the form of Sonic Mania, but it also received something of a follow-up to 2011’s Sonic Generations, one the few 3D entries the series could be proud of.

When Sonic Mania was released during the Summer, it really seemed like this was to be the year of the hedgehog, as Sonic Mania captured the very essence of Sonic’s best outings and created a fun…

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[Review] Ittle Dew 2+ (Nintendo Switch)


Developer: Ludosity

Publisher: Nicalis

Platform: Nintendo Switch

Category: Action, Adventure, Puzzles & Role-Playing

Release Date: 14th of November, 2017 (EU & NA) Continue reading [Review] Ittle Dew 2+ (Nintendo Switch)

Super Mario Odyssey Review


Wizard Dojo looks at Mario’s latest. Is it another masterpiece? (spoiler: yes it is)

Wizard Dojo

Much has been said of how Super Mario Odyssey is the return to the “sandbox style” of Mario game found in Super Mario 64 and Super Mario Sunshine. But the truth is it’s much more than that. This is the latest evolution in a series that is no stranger to evolving, as it feels like a  culmination of everything Mario has learned up to this point, all tied together with a bag of tricks that are entirely its own. World ensured Mario was an icon to endure past the 8-bit NES, 64 brought Mario into the third dimension and changed the way platformers are played, and Galaxy turned the very nature of the series on its head (often literally). Odyssey is the latest continuation of Mario’s progression, as it contorts and redefines the very foundations of gaming’s greatest icon.

From the get-go, it’s easy to tell that Odyssey is something…

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Super Mario Odyssey Impressions


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I’ll just come outright and say it; Super Mario Odyssey is wonderful. I still have a way to go before I beat it and collect everything, but from what I’ve seen so far, every minute of Odyssey has been a joy.

Having played Odyssey back at E3 2017, it’s interesting to see what has changed. Namely, the motion-controls when playing with two joycons feels smoother than they did at E3 (though the E3 demo also didn’t explain the motion-controls in full detail, so maybe I just know what I’m doing now). It’s wonderful how well the game controls. Here I thought I was going to prefer using the joycons docked in the controller, but I actually think I enjoy the motion-controls more. It all feels so fluid.

Then we have the capture abilities, which are constantly changing up the gameplay. It’s so much fun just to see how every last character and creature plays. So far, my favorites have been the Chomp, the T. Rex and the tank!

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“Though the bosses are a little on the easy side, they are consistently inventive and fun.”

There’s just so much gameplay exuding from every corner of Odyssey, it’s astounding! And the whole game is riddled in little surprises in every detail. It’s very reminiscent of collecting the Korok seeds in Breath of the Wild, but even more playful with how it inspires curiosity in the player. It seems in every moment I’ve wanted to search every last corner of a stage to find secret moons!

It’s perhaps the level design that’s Odyssey’s biggest highlight, with ever level being vastly different than the one that came before. Not just in aesthetics and themes, but also the obstacles, capture abilities and, most importantly, ideas.

So far, there’s simply never been a dull moment in Super Mario Odyssey. It has that same level of polish and consistent inventiveness of the Galaxy games or Super Mario World. I still may have a way to go, but so far, Super Mario Odyssey has the potential to wrest Breath of the Wild’s crown for the title of best game of 2017.

[Review] Super Mario Sunshine (Nintendo GameCube)


Developer: Nintendo EAD

Publisher: Nintendo

Platform: Nintendo

Category: Platformer, Action & Adventure

Release Date: 19th of July, 2002 (JP), 26th of August, 2002 (NA) & 4th of October, 2002 (EU) Continue reading [Review] Super Mario Sunshine (Nintendo GameCube)

Banjo-Tooie Review


Wizard Dojo revisits another old-timey favorite. How well does Banjo and Kazooie’s second adventure hold up after seventeen years?

Wizard Dojo

*Review based on Banjo-Tooie’s release as part of Rare Replay*

There’s perhaps no game that better represents the “everything and the kitchen sink” mentality quite like Rare’s Banjo-Tooie. This 2000 sequel to Banjo-Kazooie looked to improve upon its predecessor in virtually every regard. Though Tooie was also released after Rare’s over-bloated Donkey Kong 64, so it attempted to find a balance between making the Banjo-Kazooie experience bigger and better, while avoiding the pitfalls of tedium of DK64. For the most part, Banjo-Tooie succeeded in its difficult balancing act, providing one of the N64’s best experiences, and an adventure that was so massive it still feels like a hefty title even by today’s standards.

Though Banjo-Tooie retains the same Mario 64-style gameplay of Kazooie, it also seems to have taken a few notes from Ocarina of Time, as Tooie’s overworld structure feels more like something out of an action/adventure title. The…

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Banjo-Kazooie Review


TheManCalledScott of Wizard Dojo revisits one of his favorite childhood games. Does it hold up?

Wizard Dojo

*Review based on Banjo-Kazooie’s release as part of Rare Replay*

In the wake of Super Mario 64 came a new kind of platformer. Differing from the 2D sidescrollers of the past and earlier, more linear 3D platformers such as Crash Bandicoot, Super Mario 64 ushered in a more open-world style for the genre, one that had a greater focus on collecting specific key items at the player’s own leisure,  as opposed to simply making it to the end of a stage. Of all the ‘collect-a-thon’ 3D platformers that were born in Super Mario 64’s wake, there’s perhaps no more beloved example of this sub-genre than Rare’s Banjo-Kazooie.

Released in 1998 – a mere two years after Mario took his revolutionary first steps into the third-dimension – Rare sought to accomplish the seemingly impossible, and beat Mario at his own game. Rare’s bear and bird duo nearly pulled off that feat…

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[Review] Star Fox 2 (SNES Classic Edition)


Developer: Argonaut Games & Nintendo

Publisher: Nintendo

Platform: SNES Classic Edition

Category: Action & Shooter

Release Date: 29th of September, 2017 (EU & NA) & 5th of October, 2017 (JP)

Continue reading [Review] Star Fox 2 (SNES Classic Edition)

[Review] Culdcept Revolt (Nintendo 3DS)


Developer: Omiya Soft

Publisher: NIS America

Platform: Nintendo 3DS

Category: Board game/RPG

Release Date: 3rd of October, 2017 (US) & 6th of October, 2017 (PAL) Continue reading [Review] Culdcept Revolt (Nintendo 3DS)