Zelda Breath Of The Wild Devs Open Up To Famitsu About Ganon & Zelda’s Role In The Story & More


Famitsu will be publishing an interview this week with Zelda: BOTW Devs, Eiji Aonuma & Hidemaro Fujibayashi to talk a little more about the game. The official release is tomorrow but that hasn’t stopped a few tidbits from sneaking through the cracks and appearing online. You can find an extract of the interview below.*Please note that the original text is in Japanese and that this is a loose translation in English. Some tenses and pretexts may have been lost in translation.

While Zelda was given more character depth, Ganon is only referred to as a Calamity with little background. Why is this?
Fujibayashi “For his character’s role, it wasn’t necessary for him to be personified. If he was to speak, then we would have to give him a back story and would have been an obstruction to the flow of the game, which is why he is shaped as he is a character. 

Why did you make Zelda the way she is, someone with a strong character yet seems to suffer with an inferiority complex?
Fujibayashi “Her story was easy to write this way. Also, some of  the staff that was in charge of the screenplay strongly recommended this kind of scenario (laughs). Her personality is to have some function as well.

(in the history of Hyrule, this story is where to be positioned?)
Fujibayashi “I’ll leave it … to your imagination,”
Aonuma” The history of Hyrule changes with time. In fact, even until now, subtle changes take place. Even the history of our world changes from time to time so why not Hyrule? School text books get changed with every new detail that is discovered from the past. So it like finding an ancient document (laugh) ”

Obviously the next game will be a great challenge but will it still involve “open air?” Will it have conventional dungeons? How will it be?
Aonuma” Maybe this (Open-Air) is the new standard I think for Zelda games in the future. “

*Please note that the original text is in Japanese and that this is a loose translation in English. Some tenses and pretexts may have been lost in translation.

Source: Etseru Blog

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